Country

In The Middle Of The Country, A Hospital And Its Community Prepare For The Surge

Megan Kampling and her husband were only a few days into a spring break trip with their children when Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly shut down schools in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

“We both just looked at each other and said, ‘What are we going to do?’” Kampling recalled.

She works in the pharmacy department at Ascension Via Christi hospitals in Wichita and her husband is an officer with the Wichita Police Department, making them both essential workers who could not work remotely. But they have a 2-year-old and a kindergartner.

The hospital system where she works came to the rescue: Via Christi opened its Child Development Center to the elementary school children of its staffers. Kampling, whose toddler already went there, is being reimbursed for the

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As The Country Disinfects, Diabetes Patients Can’t Find Rubbing Alcohol

While the masses hunt for toilet paper, Caroline Gregory and other people with diabetes are on a different mission: scouring stores for the rubbing alcohol or alcohol swabs needed to manage their disease.

Gregory stopped in Carlie C’s, Dollar General and then Harris Teeter in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in pursuit of this vital component of her medical routine.

“We’re all supposed to be staying at home, and I’m out going to 10 different stores,” said Gregory, 33, whose diabetes could heighten her risk for COVID-19 complications. “That’s also not safe.”

Rubbing alcohol and alcohol swabs or wipes are the latest products swept up by the nation’s demand for anything and everything seen as a disinfectant against the novel coronavirus — by hospitals and average consumers alike.

Andy Lerman, vice president of operations for Hydrox Laboratories, a manufacturer based outside Chicago, said the majority of the low-profit-margin medical product his

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Dispatch From A Country Doctor: Seeing Patients Differently In The Time Of Coronavirus

Patients would often stop by River Bend Family Medicine just to gab with staff at the front desk or bring baked goods to Dr. Matt Hahn.

“I’m a simple country doctor,” said Hahn, who has practiced in Hancock, Maryland, for 20 years ― the past decade at his River Bend office. “Our waiting room is like a social network in and of itself.” Hahn is also a candidate for West Virginia’s 2nd Congressional District though he has backed away from campaigning because of the coronavirus threat.

His waiting room is now closed for the same reason. But Hahn’s practice in this small town — pinned hard up against the borders with West Virginia and Pennsylvania, about 100 miles northwest of Washington, D.C. ― is not.

Patients who need an in-office appointment call when they get to the parking lot and wait there instead. A staff member escorts them in, opening

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