Ex-West Virginia Health Chief Says Cuts Hurt Virus Response

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The former West Virginia public health leader forced out by the governor says decades-old computer systems and cuts to staff over a period of years had made a challenging job even harder during a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Republican Gov. Jim Justice demanded Dr. Cathy Slemp’s resignation on June 24. He complained about discrepancies in the number of active cases and accused Slemp of not doing her job. He has refused to elaborate.

In her first comments about what happened, Slemp declined in a series of interviews to directly discuss the governor’s decision, saying she wanted to focus on improving the public health system. She defended how the data was handled and she detailed how money dwindled over the years. That meant fewer staff members, and they were hobbled by outdated technology that slowed their everyday work and their focus on the coronavirus.

Among the challenges: a computer

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Herbalife Reviews – Aloe Vera and Other Useful Products

Herbalife Nutrition’s Herbal Aloe Soothing Gel is helpful to people who want to improve the complexion of their skin. That’s because it contains aloe vera, which hydrates and softens your skin. It’s also devoid of any scents, and because of that, it can be appropriate for individuals who have fragrance sensitivities. Although it has numerous botanicals, it doesn’t have any dyes, parabens, or colors. It has been clinically analyzed to promote skin softness and improve its appearance, and it’s great for individuals who suffer from persistent skin dryness. It can also be advantageous for people who have dehydrated and rough skin. It can make a helpful day-to-day product for users.

The Herbalife Herbal Aloe Hand & Body Cream is great for people who want to hydrate their skin. This cream offers all sorts of moisturizing perks without any oily or heavy feeling. Research shows that it rapidly boosts the skin’s … Read More

Colorado, Like Other States, Trims Health Programs Amid Health Crisis

As a teenager, Paulina Castle struggled for years with suicidal thoughts. When her mental health was at its most fragile, she would isolate herself, spending days in her room alone.

“That’s the exact thing that makes you feel significantly worse,” the 26-year-old Denver woman said. “It creates a cycle where you’re constantly getting dug into a deeper hole.”

Part of her recovery involved forcing herself to leave her room to socialize or to exercise outside. But the COVID-19 pandemic has made all of that much harder. Instead of interacting with people on the street in her job as a political canvasser, she is working at home on the phone. And with social distancing rules in place, she has fewer opportunities to meet with friends.

“Since the virus started,” she said, “it’s been a lot easier to fall back into that cycle.”

Between the challenges of the pandemic, the social unrest

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Amid Surge, Hospitals Hesitate To Cancel Nonemergency Surgeries

Three months ago, the nation watched as COVID-19 patients overwhelmed New York City’s intensive care units, forcing some of its hospitals to convert cafeterias into wards and pitch tents in parking lots.

Hospitals elsewhere prepped for a similar surge: They cleared beds, stockpiled scarce protective equipment, and — voluntarily or under government orders — temporarily canceled nonemergency surgeries to save space and supplies for coronavirus patients.

In most places, that surge in patients never materialized.

Now, coronavirus cases are skyrocketing nationally and hospitalizations are climbing at an alarming rate. But the response from hospitals is markedly different.

Most hospitals around the country are not canceling elective surgeries — nor are government officials asking them to.

Instead, hospitals say they are more prepared to handle the crush of patients because they have enough protective gear for their workers and know how to better treat coronavirus patients. They say they will shut

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