Hospital

Hospital Workers Complain of Minimal Disclosure After COVID Exposures

Dinah Jimenez assumed a world-class hospital would be better prepared than a chowder house to inform workers when they had been exposed to a deadly virus.

So, when her boyfriend, an employee of a popular seafood restaurant in Seattle, received a call from his boss on a Sunday in late March telling him a co-worker had tested positive for COVID-19 and that he needed to quarantine for 14 days, she said she assumed she’d get a similar call from the University of Washington Medical Center. After all, the infected restaurant employee worked a second job alongside her at the hospital’s Plaza Cafe.

That call never came, she said.

Jimenez, 42, said she returned to her job as a cashier at the hospital cafeteria two days later, and “it was like nothing had happened. They didn’t say anything.” She said the infected worker, a fellow cashier, was stationed just 2 feet

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In The Middle Of The Country, A Hospital And Its Community Prepare For The Surge

Megan Kampling and her husband were only a few days into a spring break trip with their children when Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly shut down schools in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

“We both just looked at each other and said, ‘What are we going to do?’” Kampling recalled.

She works in the pharmacy department at Ascension Via Christi hospitals in Wichita and her husband is an officer with the Wichita Police Department, making them both essential workers who could not work remotely. But they have a 2-year-old and a kindergartner.

The hospital system where she works came to the rescue: Via Christi opened its Child Development Center to the elementary school children of its staffers. Kampling, whose toddler already went there, is being reimbursed for the

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The COVID-19 Bailout That’s Left Every Hospital Unhappy In Its Own Way

In the throes of the novel coronavirus outbreak in early April, Kenneth Raske, president of the powerful Greater New York Hospital Association, took his case for needing billions in federal relief funding to another New Yorker, well placed in the White House.

The April 8 call with Jared Kushner lasted “probably 30 seconds.” After all, Raske said, the facts speak for themselves.

The hospitals Raske represents across New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Rhode Island have registered hundreds of thousands COVID-19 cases. They are on the front lines of the most urgent and horrific outbreak in the country.

In Missouri, Scotland County Hospital CEO Dr. Randy Tobler said his staff has seen just four outpatient cases. He wrote to his senator, Republican Roy Blunt, seeking help securing bailout money. The focus on the coronavirus has brought elective procedures and routine care — the lifeblood of his operation — to

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‘When It Starts Getting Into Your Local Hospital, It Becomes Real’

The folding chairs outside the windows appeared late last month, after the maintenance staff at St. James Parish Hospital labeled each window with a patient room number so families and friends could at least see their loved ones battling COVID-19.

Yet even this small solace the Louisiana rural hospital can offer is tainted for clinical nurse educator Leslie Fisher. She has to remind the family members to take shifts to properly social distance from one another — even when their loved ones could be in their final moments.

The difficult conversations feel unceasingly cruel, she said, but she feels she has an obligation to protect these people, too. All she can do is look them in the eyes and say, “I’m so, so sorry.”

Folding chairs outside the hospital’s windows allow families and friends to see their loved ones battling COVID-19.

This is the new normal for St. James Parish

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