Insurance

In Texas, More People Are Losing Their Health Insurance as COVID Cases Climb

Steve Alvarez started feeling sick around Father’s Day weekend this year. His symptoms started as mild, but developed into a fever, chills and shortness of breath he couldn’t shake.

“Just when I started to get to feeling better and I would have a couple of good days,” Alvarez said. “I felt like I’d backtrack and I was just really run down. This thing lingered and lingered.”

Alvarez, a Tejano musician who lives in the San Antonio area, said he eventually got a free COVID-19 test provided by the city of San Antonio. A week later, he found out he tested positive for the coronavirus.

Steve Alvarez stands with his wife, Regina. Alvarez is a Tejano musician who had no health insurance when he was diagnosed with COVID-19. Money has been tight because the pandemic dried up his musical gigs.

Alvarez and his wife — who also became infected — never

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Coronavirus Surprise: IRS Allows Midyear Insurance And FSA Changes

The economic upheaval and social disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic have upended the assumptions many people made last fall about which insurance plan to sign up for, or how much of their pretax wages to sock away in health or dependent care flexible spending accounts.

You may find yourself in a high-priced health plan you can no longer afford because of a temporary pay cut, unable to get the medical care you might have planned and budgeted for, or not sending the kids to day care. Normally you’d be stuck with the choices you made unless you had a major life event such as losing your job, getting married or having a child. But this year, things may be different.

Last month, the Internal Revenue Service announced it would let employees add, drop or alter some of their benefits for the remainder of 2020. But there’s a catch: Your

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How A Company Misappropriated Native American Culture To Sell Health Insurance

Jill Goodridge was shopping for affordable health insurance when a friend told her about O’NA HealthCare, a low-cost alternative to commercial insurance.

The self-described “health care cooperative” promised a shield against catastrophic claims. Its name suggested an affiliation with a Native American tribe — a theme that carried through on its website, where a feather floats from section to section.

The company promises 24/7 telemedicine and holistic dental care on its website. It says it provides more nontraditional options than “any other health care plan,” including coverage for essential oils, energy medicine and naturopathic care. All of that and conventional care, too.

It struck Goodridge as innovative. She signed up for a high-deductible plan, paying more than $9,000 in premiums and fees over 13 months, she said. Yet she could not get O’NA to cover her family’s medical bills. For example, O’NA applied only a small portion of more

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Tourists, Beware: Foreign Visitors’ Travel Health Insurance Might Exclude Pandemics

It was evident that the fever, nausea and loss of appetite Vlastimil Gajdoš felt on his wedding day was not a mere case of cold feet.

Gajdoš, 65, fell ill in Honolulu in March after arriving with his bride-to-be from the Czech Republic. He and Sylva Di Sandro, 58, intended to marry and sell my house fast honeymoon on the island.

While they did tie the knot, they also engaged in serious battle with the novel coronavirus. He was in the hospital for two weeks, some of it in intensive care, on a ventilator. Like many visitors to the U.S., who are aware that health care prices here can be higher than back home, Gajdoš purchased a travel insurance plan that covered up to $300,000 in medical expenses.

But after Gajdoš was diagnosed with COVID-19 and his wife called to check whether his care would be covered, the newlyweds discovered

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