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Drugmakers Tout COVID-19 Vaccines To Refurbish Their Public Image

Johnson & Johnson researchers working on a vaccine against the coronavirus are “just like the heroes in the hospitals” fighting to save patients, J&J CEO Alex Gorsky said on the “Today” show a few weeks ago.

It’s a message he likes to deliver. In recent weeks, Gorsky has talked about J&J’s efforts on NBC’s “Today” and twice on CNBC and Fox. Nobody asked him about high drug prices, J&J’s role in the opioid crisis or lawsuits alleging its baby powder caused cancer.

J&J and the rest of the pharmaceutical industry have seized on the coronavirus crisis as a way to polish an image tarnished by unaffordable medicine, patent lawsuits and an addiction epidemic.

The potential payoff is clear: If drug companies can produce a successful vaccine or therapy against the biggest infectious threat in a century, “maybe you can start to undo some of that reputational damage,” said Michael Kinch,

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Always The Bridesmaid, Public Health Rarely Spotlighted Until It’s Too Late

The U.S. is in the midst of both a public health crisis and a health care crisis. Yet most people aren’t aware these are two distinct things. And the response for each is going to be crucial.

If you’re not a health professional of some stripe, you might not realize that the nation’s public health system operates in large part separately from the system that provides most people’s medical care.

Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, a former deputy commissioner for the Food and Drug Administration and now vice dean at the school of public health at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, distinguishes the health care

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‘An Arm And A Leg’: What A Fleet Of Firetrucks Can Teach About Public Health

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Ryan Gamlin spent a decade on the business side of health care — working with insurance companies. That was before he went to medical school. Now, he’s an anesthesiologist in Los Angeles and on the front lines fighting COVID-19.

It’s an experience he described as “scary, in a way that I never expected to be scared, going to work.”

He was frightened one day last summer, too, when a California wildfire came within feet of the hospital where he was working. But then, a fleet of firetrucks showed up to protect the hospital.

“City, county, park service, forest service, new trucks, old trucks, unmarked trucks,” Gamlin tweeted.

These days, with medical equipment from masks to ventilators in short supply, he’s been thinking back to that experience.

“I realized the fundamental difference between public safety and health care. Public safety is built

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How Do We Exit The Shutdown? Hire An Army Of Public Health Workers

Last month, facing the prospect of overwhelmed hospitals and unchecked spread of the novel coronavirus, seven Bay Area county and city health departments joined forces to become the first region in the nation to pass sweeping regulations ordering millions of people indoors and shuttering the local economy.

It shocked people, but health experts around the country applauded the bold step, which since has been broadly replicated.

They also say it can’t go on forever. And so Bay Area leaders, along with others around the nation, are trying to figure out how we can resume something akin to normal life without triggering a catastrophic wave of illness and death.

The shelter-in-place orders were a sledgehammer response to two colliding realities: a little-understood virus that is proving ferociously deadly in

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